Sunstone, An Exhibition

*Aleah Chapin *Amber Hany *Alan Macdonald *Alannah Farrell *Angela Fraleigh *Angela Gram*Anna Mond *Anthony White *Ben Howe *Brandi Twilley *Buket Savci *Christina Duarte *Corinne Beardsley *Daniel Maidman *Eric Mavko *Eric Wert *Hannah Murray *Heidi Elbers *Jamie Martinez *Jacob Hicks* Jessica Damsky *Jiannan Wu *Kaitlyn Stubbs *Kiley Ames *Kristin Kwan *Margaret McCann *Mariano Ching *Meg Franklin *Melanie Vote *Michelle Doll *Miguel Carter-Fisher *Nehemiah Cisneros *Rob Plater *Susannah Martin *Sui Park *Vini Nascimento *Zachari Logan

Sunstone is a silicate mineral occurring in igneous, a type of rock formed of molten material. Mineral platelet positioning within sunstone creates aventurescence, a phenomena of visual radiance, a sparkle. The platelet orientation and density within influences the perceived hue of the stone, forming a radiant topology.

2020 has been a singularly challenging year. Artists, as always, continue to seek reprieve and triumph over obstacle and tragedy in the expression, translation and embodiment of feeling into object. We continue to make the unseen seen, to manifest form through the transformation of materiality. We give life to the most remote elements of the unconscious. The muse ignites us and is like the metallic glitter scattering through igneous rock. Dazzling, short lived, but birthed by every angle, every new challenge, it is a radiance inside the artist like inside the sunstone that prolongs us, that carries us forward.

Thank you to all who submitted work, more generally, thank you to every artist. The work you do is fundamental and courageous.

Click work to expand.

Vini Naso, The Raven, digital, 30 x 40 in

Website: Vini Nascimento,

Instagram: @vininaso

Anthony White, Exposure Control, pla on panel, 36 x 36 in

Website: Anthony White

Instagram: @culturalcrisis

Jessica Damsky, Carnal Garden, oil on panel, 16 x 12 in

Website: Jessica Damsky

Instagram: @jessicadamsky

Susannah Martin, Bavaria, oil on canvas, 170 x 240 cm

Website: Susannah Martin

Instagram: @susannah_martin

Buket Savci, Brooklyn Happening, oil on canvas, 28 x 46 in

Website: Buket Savci

Instagram: @buketsavci

Zachari Logan, Esta Selva Selvaggia, Installation, Collateral Project of the 58th Venice Biennale Thetis Foundation, pastel on black paper, 59 x 288 in

Website: Zachari Logan

Instagram: @zachari_logan

Angela Gram, Transfigured Night, oil on linen, 50 x 60 in

Website: Angela Gram

Instagram: @angelagramart

Margaret McCann, Freudian Still Life, oil on linen, 24 x 30 in

Website: Margaret McCann

Instagram: @margaret_mccann_art

Meg Franklin, Waterfall Night, velvet, wood, foam, rocks, pins, glue, 16 x 11 x 6 in

Website: Meg Franklin

Instagram: @gabooldra)

Alan Macdonald, The Temple of Reason, oil on linen, 70 x 80 in

Website: Alan Macdonald

Instgram: @alanmacdonaldart

Anna Mond, The Milkmaid, After Vermeer, acrylic on canvas, 50 x 40 cm

Website: Anna Mond

Instagram: @annamond

Hannah Murray, Hearts of Gold, oil on canvas, 46 x 36 in

Website: Hannah Murray

Instagram: @hannah_murray_artist

Kristin Kwan, Tiger, Tiger, oil on panel, 11 x 14 in

Website: Kristin Kwan

Instagram: @kristinkwanart

Eric Mavko, Vulture, mixed media on canvas, 50 x 32 in

Website: Eric Mavko

Instagram: @emavko

Alannah Farrell, Midsummer Night 2nd Street, oil on canvas, 60 x 36 in

Website: Alannah Farrell

Instagram: @alannah.farrell.studio

Kaitlyn Stubbs, September 15, 2020, oil on canvas, 9 x 12 in

Website: Kaitlyn Stubbs

Jacob Hicks, Tribute to Toni Morrison, oil on panel, 24 x 32 in

Website: Jacob Hicks

Instagram: @jacob_hicks_studio

Corinne Beardsley, Missing Touch, The Companion Series, video

Website: Corinne Beardsley

Instagram:@corinnebeardsley

Nehemiah Cisneros, Playfully Serious, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 84 in

Website: Nehemiah Cisneros

Instagram: @nehemiahcisneros

Eric Wert, Nimbus, oil on canvas, 60 x 48 in

Website: Eric Wert

Instagram: @ericwert33

Daniel Maidman, Tanya, The Pond, Morning, colored pencil on paper, 15 x 11 in

Instagram: @danielmaidman

Christina Duarte, Venus with Usagi, oil on canvas, 18 x 26 in

Website: Christina Duarte

Instagram: @cmdoart

Rob Plater, Awkward Imitation, ink on paper,  8 x 10 in

Website: Rob Plater

Instagram: @tmoplater

Angela Fraleigh, Our World Swells Like Dawn When the Sun Licks the Water, oil & acrylic on canvas, 90 x 198 in

Website: Angela Fraleigh

Mariano Ching, Float In Rainbow, oil on canvas, 60 x 60 in

Website: ariano Ching

Instagram: @bangawsabaw

Kiley Ames, A Story of Beauty and Blindness, oil on linen, 80 x 50 in

Website: Kiley Ames

Instagram: @Kiley Ames 

Jiannan Wu, Trilogy Ⅱ, Acrylic on resin, wood, 8 x 10 x 3.4 in

Website: Jiannan Wu

Instagram: @jiannan_wu

Heidi Elbers, Swampland, oil on paper, 14 x 11 in

Website: Heidi Elbers

Instagram: @heidielbers

Miguel Carter-Fisher, Aparna Feeding Violet, charcoal on toned paper, 15 x 23 in

Website: Miguel Carter-Fisher

Instagram: @MiguelCFstudio

Melanie Vote, Recumbent, oil on paper on panel, 9 x 12 in

Website: Melanie Vote

Instagram: @melanievotestudio

Brandi Twilley, Summer Morning, oil on canvas, 14 x 26 in

Website: Brandi Twilley

Instagram: @branditwilley

Michelle Doll, Family (MF2 Micro), oil on panel, 10 x 13.25 in

Website: Michelle Doll

Instagram: @michellelynndoll

Sui Park, Keyhole, black cable ties, 59 x 24 x 4.5 (H) in

Website: Sui Park

Instagram: @park.sui

Amber Hany, A Portrait of my Kitchen Window, digital painting, 2100 x 2800 px

Website: Amber Hany

Instagram: @amberhany_art

Ben Howe, Dream, oil on canvas, 122 x 160 cm

Instagram: @benhoweart

Jamie Martinez, Metamorphosing Into an Octopus, paint, spell, marker and scratches on clay, 9 in round

Website: Jamie Martinez

Instagram: @triangulism

Aleah Chapin, Deborah, oil on panel, 20 x 30 in, courtesy of the artist and Flowers Gallery, New York/London/Hong Kong 

Website: Aleah Chapin

Instagram: @aleah_chapin

Review: Willehad Eilers, LA BLAGUE

Galerie Droste, 5 Dec – 19 Dec 2020

DAS SCHWEIN, oil on canvas, 145 x 190 cm

Willehad Eilers or Wayne Horse, the German painter, asks us to participate in la blague-the joke-that is excoriated from asking “what remains when food and other essential goods are always available? When war is only known from the news and you never have to fear for your life? When money and infrastructure are always available?” 

“What remains is your own self-optimization and self-realization. However, the range of what is ‘offered’ as success, happiness or a fulfilled life is relatively small. Thus, not only a general alarming shift of self-related problems can be observed, but also a repetitive and unrealistic representation of life as a single high, as a single party” (text excerpt via Galerie Droste).

Eilers paints this electrifyingly gruesome perpetual party. The work elicits tarts or war head candies, undulating between opulence and disgust, sour and sweet. They are monumentally-scaled, in the vein of the great history paintings. They are surreal conflagrations parallel to German expressionism and its counter Neue Sachlichkeit forbearers who explored their era’s identical fever dreams of deadening excess, the roaring 20’s of the Weimar Republic. It is somehow difficult for us to learn human time is a record on perpetual loop. 

Dreh Dich Nicht Um, oil on canvas, 160 x 240 cm

A fertility trope of woman as rabbit travels through the paintings, represented by the Playboy bunny ears sitting on the various heads of female party-goers. Empires rise and fall like anthills, this is forgotten in the weight of human instinct and hunger. The desire to propagate one’s influence and stake in the future, to revel in the lack of need given to the few who efface it for the many, rules the stretched, broken forms composing these apocalyptic orgies. 

Baby with You, oil on canvas, 52 x 39 cm

The paintings are grandly base and biting, pulling the viewer into a common pit dug of endless surplus, into tornado earthquake zombie hoards of the “well-to-do,” so drunk and empty on account of deadening blackhole enjoyments.

Their is a dangerous pathology that afflicts the global affluent, the hegemony that will not relinquish its power and refuses empathy for those not positioned on top. The obscenely wealthy minority of white males who control the distribution of human resources do not concern themselves with a human communal fate but with their individual comfort and, secondarily, a familial fate. This group has waged a multi-generational war conquering as much of the world’s resources as possible through the widening boundaries of globalized reach, and they have won this war to the detriment of the world, humanity ecologically, and (most ironically) themselves. Morals play no part, truth and honesty play no part, just the basest instinct for more. The distinct and succinct goal of a conqueror is to claim everything for himself, though this subjugates, imprisons, and restrains any hope for change for the majority of humanity.

DER SCHERZ, oil on canvas, 145 x 190 cm

The longing for accumulation, material and control is an incessant human instinct that prevails in the uneducated, fearful and unconscious. Unlike what might be historically perceived, a lack of true education (this excludes an education purchased or performed) is a fundamental feature of the present global aristocracy. Why would an ill-informed hegemon venture to consider empathy when life-long entitlement demonstrates the only necessity is that the world consider him?

Capital He is trapped in his personally sickening fumigation, this thoughtless roach, this image constructed and desired not only poisoning those without, but those within. Notably, the tyrant is profoundly unaware of his own brittleness and stupidity, the decay of his state, exhibit A: Donald Trump, or The General in His Labyrinth, by Gabriel García Márquez, or any number of fumbling or poised dictators or corporate male managers, landlords, or business owners.

Installation View

Eilers applies an accessible and cruel visual language to illustrate all of this, it is an important critique on a sweepingly infirm world and it comes at a crucial time.

Artist portrait: Willehad Eilers/ Wayne Horse

Review: Apostasy by Super A

Thinkspace, December 12-January 2, 2021

“Skeletor” (2020) Acrylic on linen, 20″ × 30″

“The abandonment or renunciation of a religious or political belief.”-Oxford Languages

Apostasy, by Dutch artist Super A /Stefan Thelen, is one of the first slated exhibitions at Thinkspace Project’s new gallery.

These images are indebted to the act of wrapping, obfuscating and exposing. The history of art finds perpetual eroticism in forms simultaneously revealed and hidden; excitement pools in the act of almost seeing, in the frustration of quieted revelation. Super A wraps Stefan Thelen (himself) in a duel identity. He, like his art, is both hidden and seen.

“The Itchy & Scratchy Show”(2020) Acrylic on linen, 28″ × 34″

The works are palimpsest shrines, pristine painted illusions to Saturday morning cartoons and adolescence. American pop culture is a ribbon enveloping actuality, or what actuality is boiled down to. For example, The cartoon He-Man’s Skeletor wraps up a skull, Disney’s Big Bad Wolf a true wolf. 

Visual form as we know it in the natural world contains so many kinds of reality: action, emotion, sense, impulse, impression, association. One thing is never one thing. It is the task of the artist to reveal, to peel the proverbial onion of subjectivity aroused by reality. Super A’s act of apostasy is refusing the surface identity prescribed by a culture that equates maturity with the renunciation of itself from myth and metaphor, scrubbing away magic and ceremony and childhood. The paintings are bold and rich, but the repetition of wrapping one “thing” in only one “ribbon” might be a limiting tendency, a minor criticism for a beautifully realized body of work. 

“Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf?” (2020), Acrylic on linen, 71″ × 51″

Contemporary America, as I learned it in the suburbs of West Texas, fears the perpetual layers of the real, the depth of infinity sinking and rising from every life and object. It is in this animism one reveals dream to free themselves from the bonds of institution- church and state, god and country. Institutions maintain control by halting personal and cultural evolution. By their very nature they resist change; change demands new order. The integrated self cannot be compartmentalized, the goal of the oppressor is to cut the Möbius strip, the task of the artist is to heal it.

“Fata Morgana” (2020), Acrylic on linen, 32″ × 40″